Fraud Risk Quiz

The things you do online and offline can put you at risk of identity theft and other types of fraud.

Take our five minute test to find out the areas where you could be at risk.

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Your score: xx/26 | Risk rating: xx

There's no need to panic, but there are plenty of things you could be doing to better protect yourself from fraud. Based on your answers, we've identified the areas you could be at risk. Read our advice on the ways you can protect yourself online.

You're not in the highest risk category but there are still things you could be doing to better protect yourself. Based on your answers, we've identified the areas you could be at risk. Read our advice on the ways you can protect yourself online.

Well done, you seem to be doing a pretty good job at minimising your fraud risk. But if you'd like to make sure you're doing everything you can, read our advice on the ways you can protect yourself online.

Q. Do you ever use public wifi for browsing the internet on your smartphone, tablet or laptop computer for any of the following activities?

A. Yes ()

For greater security, always use a secure wifi network, such as the one you use at home, to do anything that could involve revealing sensitive personal or financial information. Public networks can put your data at risk of being intercepted

Wifi hotspots with 'WAP2' encryption are far safer than those without. These require you to enter a network security key or a password, obtained from the hotspot provider, on a secure https sign-in page.

Be aware that anyone using the same hotspot will have access to its login and password too, but it is less risky than using an unsecured network.

The risk of your phone's 3G/4G network being compromised is very low.

Q. Do you have antivirus software installed on your main computer?

A.

Computers often come with some in-built protection, but it is worth investing in some additional antivirus software - especially if you are using your device or computer to store sensitive personal and financial data.

You can compare different packages and find Which? Best Buys (including free options) in our online review of antivirus software.

Q. Is your smartphone protected with a password, Pin or fingerprint recognition login?

A.

If someone finds or steals your smartphone, they could potentially get access to your emails, shopping apps, contacts, photographs and more. Setting up a passcode can prevent anyone else from accessing your data. Some newer devices will also let you lock the device with a fingerprint reader.

Q. Do you use the same password for more than one website/account (this includes using very similar passwords for different accounts)?

A.

Sharing passwords across accounts creates a fraud risk. If a fraudster finds out the password to one of your accounts (in a data breach from a company you use for example), they could find their way into lots of others.

You should aim to use secure passwords, which are at least eight characters long (the longer the better) and ideally as complex as possible.

Start with a 'core phrase', such as a favourite meal 'steakandchips'.

Next, strengthen the core phrase by adding upper-case letters, symbols and numbers to create '$teak&ndCH1p5'. If you want to make life a little easier, customise the core phrase for different accounts. For Facebook, for example, the password could be '$teak&ndCH1p5fb'.

Q. Which of the following are publicly visible (ie visible to people you are not 'connected to' or 'friends' with) on at least one of your social media profiles?

A.

Any personal information you give away online, such as your date of birth, can put you at significant risk of identity fraud. In fact, Which? investigators have been able to successfully apply for credit cards in the names of volunteers who have shared personal information on publicly available sources online.

Set social media profiles to private, so that you are only sharing updates and personal information with people you know. For Facebook, privacy options are accessible via your settings, look for the icon in the top right-hand corner of the homepage. For LinkedIn, move your cursor over your profile photo in the top-right hand corner and select 'Privacy & Settings'.

Q. Do you ever 'add' or 'connect with' people you haven't met before on social media?

A.

Criminals are increasingly using social media to target victims, so be suspicious of friend requests from people you don't know, even if they say they know family or friends or met you in a location you know.

Q. Do you live in a building with a communal post area?

A.

Communal post areas can be a treasure trove for fraudsters. If you live in a property with a shared post area, you can take the following steps:

  • Ensure your letterbox, or the place where your mail is left for you, is secure and cannot be accessed by anyone else. Report any damage to your landlord or letting agent immediately.
  • Avoid leaving mail uncollected for long periods of time.
  • Ask someone trustworthy to collect your mail or use a collection service if you're unable to pick up your mail for a few days.
  • Make a note of the dates you are due to receive bills and bank statements, and where possible switch to receiving these documents electronically.
  • Collect new cards or chequebooks in person, if your bank offers the option.

If you suspect your mail has been stolen, contact the sender and Royal Mail immediately.

Q. Are you on the open electoral register?

A.

The open electoral register is unsecure because it means your name and address is available to anyone that searches for it. This can give fraudsters a head start if they want to apply for a credit card, or other financial products, in your name. You can opt to be on the 'edited' electoral register, which is not publicly viewable. Contact local Electoral Registration Office to opt out of the open register at any time.

If you've been on the open register at previous properties, or have lived at your current address since before 2002, you can get your address removed from directory websites such as 192.com (a directory website which uses information from the electoral register). Return this form to it by post, fax or email.

Our free Which? guides include advice on how you can better protect yourself from fraud:

REMEMBER, this quiz is only here to give you an indication of your potential fraud risk . Fraudsters are updating their tactics all of the time and there are many ways you could become a victim.

For more general help and advice about scams, including what to do if you think you have been a victim of one click here.

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